As pianist and educator, Randall Faber has appeared as special guest at universities throughout North America and Asia, including the Beijing Central Conservatory, the Shanghai Conservatory and the Royal Conservatory of Canada. He has been Convention Artist for the Music Teachers National Association Conference and master teacher for the World Conference on Piano Pedagogy, National Conference on Keyboard Pedagogy, the Australasian Piano Pedagogy Conference and the USA National Piano Teachers Institute. A Steinway Artist, Faber has given recitals throughout the United States, Canada and Asia. He has appeared on international television and on public radio in live recital broadcast. Dr. Faber holds three degrees from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in Education and Human Development from Vanderbilt University. His research on motivation and talent development has been featured in journals and media in South Korea, China, Australia, and at the 9th International Conference on Motivation in Lisbon, Portugal. Randall and his wife Nancy are well known as authors of the best-selling Piano Adventures® teaching method. Translated to seven languages, their books have sold tens of millions of copies around the world. The Fabers are co-founders of the Faber Piano Institute.

The human brain is wonderfully adaptive. This ability to change according to conditions and usage is termed plasticity. Contrary to the textbooks of past decades, we now know that the brain can change through the course of a lifetime. That’s the bright side. Despite the optimism of plasticity, we are…

Does Creative Improv evoke the image of playful, creative engagement? Perhaps in spirited play with fellow musicians or as you privately explore and express your own “voice.” Or, does improvisation evoke mild panic—“not learned here, I don’t do that, not my thing,” and, “Where’s the score?” Let’s for a moment…

Randall Faber blog: Pandemic, Politics, and Piano

  And “piano?” Is this seemingly misfit word pertinent? Indulge me to share a few personal stories of pandemic, politics, and piano—and then consider this trio of dynamics philosophically. Just a short year ago in Ann Arbor, I was dining out with pianist Emanuel Ax and a key Director of…

Our current “sheltering at home” evokes the image of Odysseus at sea, battening down the hatches and waiting out the storm.  Homer’s Odysseus faced his fear. As an adventurer, he chose to confront the unknown. He was prepared to face novel challenge, take the scars, and gain strength from learnings.…

Nancy and I join you and many around the world during this unsettling “lockdown” defense against the pandemic. Cancellation of international travel, cancellation of conventions, cancellation of schools—and now our lessons? Please know that the Piano Adventures community is here for your support. We have tools to keep you going,…

Written by Randall Faber and Mary Kathryn Archuleta If you are a piano teacher, you have likely considered opening your studio, and your heart, to the 1 in 150 children diagnosed with an autistic-spectrum disorder or other impairment. Music lessons provide the structural regularity that children with special needs require.…

If you’ve taught many adult piano students, you’ve probably made many friends. We don’t teach to make friends and, indeed, the relationship begins as a business transaction. Yet, time and again, personal relationships develop—often with more significance than our client’s developing musical skill! These friendships surprise both teacher and student.…

As piano teachers, we’re quite adept at bridging our adult world to that of the typical seven- or eight-year-old beginner. It requires only modest effort because most 1st and 2nd grade students also try to bridge their world to ours. The attempt to “bridge worlds” is two-way, so teaching and…

Piano Adventures® Primer Level Lesson Book - 2nd Edition

There is much to share with our beginning students. With limited lesson time, how do we maximize our results? Fortunately, the Primer Level presents three elements of pedagogy that have exponential value when taught in combination: introducing new notes with varied fingerings to develop note-reading skill utilizing arm weight for…

An essential concept of Level 1 is beginning articulation, specifically legato and staccato. These terms are so familiar to us as music teachers that we might overlook the importance of these touches in developing technique and musical expression. Perhaps you have noticed that there are no articulation marks at the…